Family History Long Version and Coat of Arms Display.
Double Family Coat of Arms Wedding Display.
Coat of Arms Wood Plaque Engraved on Marble Background
Coat of Arms Wood Plaque Engraved on Silver Background
Coat of Arms Wood Plaque Engraved on Black Background
Coat of Arms Wood Plaque Engraved on Gold Background
Coat of Arms & Long Surname History Wood Plaque
Coat of Arms & Short Surname History Wood Plaque
Customized Family Tree Chart with Last Name Meaning & Coat of Arms.
Single Coat of arms and Family Crest.
Sample of Family Tree Charts and Genealogy Chart Forms.

The history of Spain and its Spanish heritage can fill volumes of books. The Tree Maker has listed some of the highlights for our friends who not only like history, but want to know more about what their ancestors had to go through in their daily lives. We here at The Tree Maker have also created a number of genealogy products that can display some of your Spanish heritage by way of your coat of arms or surname history, which we have on over 700,000 last names. We can use this information on any number of genealogy charts and other products and have listed a few of them on the left side of your screen. Let us know if you have any new ideas on displaying your Spanish heritage. Keep in mind that the history of Spain shown here is just a few highlights and not an in-depth view of the entire history of the country.

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History of Spain and its Spanish Heritage

Display your Spanish coat of arms or your Spain heritage

Early Spanish Settlements: The prehistoric inhabitants of northern Spain were cave dwellers who lived by hunting wild animals. Deep in the caves they painted marvelous pictures of these animals on the rock walls. The people call Iberians, who originally came from Africa, were probably the earliest invaders of the peninsula. They were working silver mines in the south when Phoenician traders reached the Atlantic coast about 1100 B.C. The Phoenicians founded a trading post called Gabir, which later became the port of Cadiz, and they settled along the southern part of the Mediterranean coast.

The Greeks founded colonies farther north. Another people, the Celts, entered the land from the north and mingled with the Iberians. Next came the Carthaginians. They took over the Mediterranean coastal regions, but they did not go very far inland.

The Roman Conquest of Spain: The Romans were drawn into Spain during their wars with Carthage, and about 200 B.C. they set up two provinces in Spain. For two hundred years they slowly spread Roman authority and Roman speech across the peninsula. They made laws, built roads, worked the mines, and established centers of trade and commerce. Roman legions garrisoned the country, but in time only a few soldiers were needed to keep order. Spain, or Hispania, had become Romanized.

The Visigoths of Spain: As the Roman Empire began to break up, migrating Germanic tribes pressed into Spain. Toward the end of the fifth century A.D., the Visigoths made themselves masters of the country. They were Christians of the Arian sect, while the Spanish people had accepted orthodox Christianity. The Visigoths were fighting men who were not interested in commerce, trade, or learning. They ruled Spain, but they did not impose their ways on the conquered Spanish people or mix with them. Eventually the Visigoth king decided to abandon the Arian faith, and all Spain gave allegiance to the Church of Rome.

The Moors of Spain: The Visigoths were succeeded by Arab and Berber invades, called Moors, from North Africa. These Moslem people crossed the Strait of Gibraltar in 711 and slowly pushed the Christians back toward the mountains of the north and northwest. The Moorish occupation of Spain lasted until 1492, and it influenced Spanish life deeply. During the centuries of Moorish rule, most of Europe was in the Dark Ages. The Arabs valued learning, and Spain under the Moors was noted for its art, literature, and science. The Moors introduced new plants and new methods of agriculture. They brought techniques of leather working, silk culture, and glass manufacture. They built magnificent mosques and palaces surrounded by gardens.

The Re-conquest of Spain: Those Christians who had refused to submit to the Moors slowly built up their little kingdoms in the north. Castile {the land of castles}, in the central plateau, began to take the lead over the others in the eleventh century. The Castilians pushed the Moors toward the south and captured Toledo in 1085. The little Spanish states united and grew stronger. Aragon and Catalonia were joined, and Castile absorbed Leon. Finally, in 1479, Castile and Aragon were united when Ferdinand, the husband of Queen Isabella of Castile, became king of Aragon. These two rulers extended their power, and in 1492 they drove the Moors from the kingdom of Granada, the last Moorish stronghold in the land. Only those Moors who accepted Christianity were allowed to stay in Spain. The Jews of Spain were also expelled or forced to renounce their faith, because the Catholic sovereigns believed that the church and the state were indivisible. This of course is describing the Inquisition.

The Golden Era in Spain: Under Ferdinand and Isabella, Spain began to rise as a world power. Columbus opened the way to the New World and its riches. The sixteenth century was the time of Spain's greatest power and wealth. It was also a time when the arts and literature flowered.

Charles I of Spain was a grandson of Ferdinand and Isabella and also a grandson of the Hapsburg Emperor Maximilian. He became king in 1516, and four years later he was crowned as Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor. He then ruled a tremendous empire that included possessions in France, Italy, the Netherlands, Germany, and Austria. He soon added to these lands the territories conquered by the Spanish in the New World and in the western Pacific. Charles V spent most of his reign defending or extending his empire, or fighting infidels and heretics. The wealth that poured into Spain form the New World went to pay for campaigns against the Turks, against the French, and against the German Protestants. In 1556 Charles turned over to his son Philip the kingdom of Spain, The Spanish lands in Italy, the Spanish colonies, and the Netherlands. The imperial crown passed to Charles's younger brother.

Philip II, who ruled from 1556 to 1598, was deeply religious, and he continued the wars against heresy. He put down bitter uprisings in the Netherlands, and he expelled the Christianized Moors from Spain. Philip sent the Armada against England in the hope of putting Mary of Scotland, a Catholic, on the English throne. Spain had already begun to decline. The treasure from its colonies helped to build up industry in England and France, where Spain purchased manufactured goods. Spain itself was prosperous only as long as wealth continued to come into the country from overseas. But during the first half of the seventeenth century, Spanish art and literature brought glory to Spain.

Philip III {1598 - 1621}, Philip IV {1621 - 1665}, and Charles II {1665 -1700}, were generally weak rulers. Spain was involved in costly European wars. The Spanish people were heavily taxed to pay for the upkeep of the Spanish armies and the extravagances of the royal court at Madrid. Revolts broke out in parts of Spain where the people hated the harsh rule of the Castilians.

The Early Bourbons: The Hapsburg Dynasty ended with Charles II. He was succeeded by Philip of Anjou, the first of the Bourbon kings. He reigned as Philip V from 1700 to 1746. His claim to the throne was contested by the Hapsburg Archduke Charles, and the War of the Spanish succession dragged on until the Peace of Utrecht in 1713.

Philip's second son, Charles III {1759 - 1788}, was the only able and intelligent ruler of the century. He took the advice of well-informed ministers, and he tried to improve the lot of the ordinary people in Spain. Land reforms were started, highways were improved, the cities were cleaned up, and trade and industry were encouraged.

A Century of Conflict in Spain: Charles IV {1788 - 1808} and his son Ferdinand VII {1808, 1814 -1833} rank among the weakest of the Spanish kings. Napoleon forced Charles to abdicate in 1808 and go into exile. Ferdinand also submitted, and Joseph Bonaparte was given the Spanish crown. The Spanish people hated the interloper. A junta, or council of citizens, proclaimed a new and liberal constitution for Spain in 1812. They acted in the name of the rightful king. Ferdinand returned in 1814, and he soon set aside the constitution in favor of the old absolute system of royal government. Throughout his reign and that of his daughter Isabella {1833 - 1868}, Spain was troubled by internal conflicts and dissensions.

The Later Bourbons: Isabella was finally forced to leave the country. Seven years later, after a three-year reign by Prince Amadeus of Italy and two yeas as a republic, Spain recalled Isabella's son to rule as Alfonso XII {1874 - 1885}.

Alfonso XII died young, a few months before the birth of his son Alfonso XIII {1886 - 1931}. During the regency of the Queen Mother, Maria Christina, unrest and revolt in Cuba and the Philippines brought about the Spanish-American War in 1898. Spain lost the remnants of its empire in the West Indies and the Pacific. In the early part of the nineteenth century many Spanish colonies in the New World had declared their independence of Spain. Florida had been sold to the United States/ Bu 1900 Spain had colonies only in Africa.

The workers in Spain began to organize into federations and general unions during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Many of the workers represented the political left, while the government of Spain was strongly conservative. Some reforms were begun, but the Spanish people were never given much voice in their government. The Church, which was both wealthy and powerful, was generally conservative. Catalonia, which had more industry then the other parts of the country, led in the agitation for more freedom. The Catalans talked of setting up an independent state.

Spain was neutral in World War I, and wartime prosperity improved living conditions. After the war, tensions increased. In 1923 Alfonso allowed General Primo de Rivera to become dictator of Spain. The General put down the revolt in Catalonia and ruled the country firmly for a time. After 1926 the situation grew worse. Revolts, strikes, and riots were more frequent then before. The General resigned in 1930, and a year later the King was forced to leave the country, though he did not abdicate. The Second Republic was proclaimed in 1931.

The Second Republic of Spain: The government of the republic was a coalition at first. A new constitution was drawn up. The Cortes, or general assembly, passed laws separating the state and the church, discontinuing church schools, dividing some of the large estates, and giving greater self-government to the provinces. The republicans went too far in their reform to suit the conservatives. The attacks on the Church disturbed many people in Spain, and before long there was a swing to the political right. The left won control again in the next elections, but by this time conflict between the two extremes, right and left, made compromise on moderate aims impossible. A revolt of soldiers in Morocco developed into a violent civil war in 1936.

The Spanish Civil War: The rebels, led by General Franco, had the support of many large landowners, the rich industrialists, the army, the Church, and many royalists. The central core of the rebellion was the Falange, or Spanish Fascist party, organized in 1933 by the son of Primo de Rivera. The Loyalists, or republicans, represented all kinds of left wing opinion from simple democratic liberalism to socialism, communism, and anarchism.

The war raged until 1939, and it ended with the defeat of the Loyalists. The long and bloody struggle was much more then a civil war. The fascist governments of Hitler and Mussolini sent arms, war materials, and troops to aid the Spanish Fascists, and Soviet Russia sent aid to the Spanish republicans. Volunteers also helped the Loyalists from several democratic nations who feared the rise of fascism in Europe. Officially, the democratic nations refused to intervene in the conflict.

Having wiped out or suppressed all opposition, Franco made Spain a totalitarian start. He allied Spain with Germany, but he kept the exhausted and unhappy Spanish nation neutral in World War II. Spain was not admitted to the United Nations as a charter member, but in 1952 it was allowed to join some of the special agencies. In 1955 Spain was admitted to full membership.

Of course much has changed since then and the nation of Spain is a thriving country proud of its heritage. Spain is a place that you would be proud to display your Spanish genealogy, family coat of arms or surname history.




Display your Spanish Heritage or Family History from Spain

Our genealogy charts can show your Spanish family history as well as indicate your rich heritage only found in Spain. Our family tree charts can be customized in a number of ways. You can add your blazon of arms showing all the beautiful colors that are associated with your Spanish surname. Keep in mind that we can change the design of most of our charts if necessary. Just give us a call to see what we can do for you and your ancestors. Free pedigree chart if needed.

Customized Charts With Names

9-Generation Fan Chart Plain

9-Generation Fan Chart with 2 Surname History

9-Generation Fan Chart with Coat of Arms and Surname History

9-Generation Fan Chart with 2 Coats of Arms

7-Generation Bow-Tie Chart

6-Generation Chart

6-Generation Chart 2

5-Generation Chart

5-Generation Couples Chart

4-Generation Couples Chart

Cousin's Chart

Blank Charts With No Names

9-Generation Fan Chart Plain

9-Generation Fan Chart with 2 Surname History

9-Generation Fan Chart with Coat of Arms and Surname History

9-Generation Fan Chart with 2 Coats of Arms

7-Generation Bow-Tie Chart

6-Generation Chart

6-Generation Chart 2

5-Generation Chart

5-Generation Couples Chart

4-Generation Couples Chart


Our Spanish history charts can be use in conjunction with other genealogy charts that we have. You can show your Spanish heritage in a number of different ways. The Tree Maker has other types of products that we can manipulate to fit your ancestors within the chart itself so it has that full look. These of course are great gift ideas and can be created blank or customized with a coat of arms and family crest. Then the names can be added by yourself or other family members. Give us a call if you are ready to order.




Family Crest - Alphabetic Surname Listings
A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z
Coat of Arms - Alphabetic Surname Listings
A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z

The Tree Maker ask that you please read the "Frequently Asked Questions" section before ordering. It covers a number of subjects in detail. Most of the questions are in regards to customization to family tree charts, family coat of arms, family crest symbol, Design Your Own Coat of Arms Symbol, surname history, family rings, and last name meaning, but the first few apply to everyone. This will help avoid any problems that could arise about your order. Free pedigree chart if needed. These family tree products make great birthday gifts, Christmas presents, or a Wedding and Anniversary gift.