Coat of Arms & Short Surname History Wood Plaque
Coat of Arms & Long Surname History Wood Plaque
Double Family Coat of Arms Wedding Display.
Customized Family Tree Chart with Last Name Meaning & Coat of Arms.
Coat of Arms Wood Plaque Engraved on Marble Background
Coat of Arms Wood Plaque Engraved on Silver Background
Coat of Arms Wood Plaque Engraved on Black Background
Coat of Arms Wood Plaque Engraved on Gold Background
Sample of Family Tree Charts and Genealogy Chart Forms.
Name Origin of Both Surnames in Your Family Genealogy.
Family History Long Version and Coat of Arms Display.
Single Coat of arms and Family Crest.
Family Name with Origin of Surname.

The history of Canada is not very long, but its Canadian heritage can be traced back to many parts of the world, especially France. This beautiful country has such natural beauty with large woodland areas and many small lakes across it. The Tree Maker has many of our genealogy visitors asking about a Canadian coat of arms or family crest from Canada. Unfortunately there is normally not any coat of arms or blazon of arms from this country. Using heraldry we got to great lengths to make sure the heritage behind each coat of arms are as accurate as we can. The history of Canada is rich {but not long}, so keep this in mind when researching your surname origin.

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History of Canada and its Canadian Heritage

Display your Canadian coat of arms or your Canada heritage

Canada the New France: Canada was probably visited by the Norsemen about the year 1000, and John Cabot, sailing for the English Crown, landed somewhere on the coast in 1497. In 1534 the bold French navigator, Jacques Cartier, entered the mouth of the St. Lawrence River; and though Cartier returned several times, permanent settlement did not begin until seventy-one years later, when Samuel de Champlain established Port Royal on the present site of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia. The French called Nova Acadia "Acadia". A few years later Champlain led an expedition up the St. Lawrence, and in 1608 he directed the founding of Quebec City.

Europeans first crossed the Atlantic to Canadian waters after fish, but the French soon decided that greater wealth lay in the furs of Canada. As long as the French held control of what they called New France, the whole economy of the territory was based on the fur trade. The French king, who collected a tax on the imported pelts, granted monopolies on fur trading. Montreal, founded in 1642 was made a fur-trading post, but the chartered fur companies did not encourage settlement as vigorously as they had been expected to.

Although they were involved in a bloody struggle with the Iroquois for many years, the French usually got along will with the various Indian tribes. As the field of operations expanded with the passing years, the voyageurs poled and paddled their small craft far up the rivers of the interior in order to collect the precious pelts, and the coureurs de bois plunged deep into the forests in search of new fur country. The efforts of professional explorers were often put to shame by the achievements of these woodsmen and of the French missionaries who journeyed through thousands of miles of unknown territory. Men like Father Marquette, Joliet, and La Salle led the way westward to the Great Lakes and south along the Mississippi Valley in the latter half of the seventeenth century.

Meanwhile the settlements in Acadia and on the St. Lawrence grew very slowly. There was much internal conflict: those who wished to encourage colonization quarreled with those interested only in fur trading; businessmen squabbled with churchmen; military and civilian authorities disagreed; and the home government interfered in colonial affairs. When Count de Frontenac became governor of the colony in 1672, New France had a population of only a few thousand. By this time British colonies to the south were well established, and England's new Hudson's Bay Company was collecting furs to the north.

In 1689 the French began their long and futile struggle against the English in the New World. The series of wars involved France and England in Europe, as well as the colonies of the two powers in America. War continued intermittently for seventy years and ended with the conquest of New France in 1763. Each side had it Indian allies, with the British supporting the savage Iroquois. The French used Indian raiders so successfully that Americans speak of the campaigns as the French and Indian War. It was a periods of terrible strife, yet in these years New France grew as it should have done earlier. Agricultural communities developed along the St. Lawrence and the population increased to about sixty thousand.

In 1755 the British expelled the Acadians from Nova Scotia because these stubborn settlers repeatedly refused to swear allegiance to the British Crown. In 1759 Wolfe defeated Montcalm on the Plains of Abraham, and Quebec City fell to the British. The following year New France gave up the struggle. By the Treaty of Paris in 1763 the French surrendered all of their possessions in America except Louisiana west of the Mississippi.

Loyalty and Rebellion in Canada: In 1774 Britain's Parliament passed the Quebec Act, which gave the French Canadians the right to retain certain of their social, religious, and judicial institutions. Political representation was lacking, but the French Canadians had never known democracy. By this legislation they were sufficiently assured of Britain's good will to repel American attempts to "free" them during the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. The Revolution brought a different sort of invasion, as well. United Empire Loyalists from the American colonies entered Canada and settled to the east and west of the French settlements in Quebec. This development resulted in 1791, the establishment of Upper Canada {Ontario} and Lower Canada {Quebec}.

In the early years of the nineteenth century, the fur traders continued to push westward. Two great competitors were the Hudson's Bay Company and the North West Company. Englishmen and Scotsmen managed both companies, but both depended largely upon French-Canadian traders and trappers. The companies fought each other until the British Government had to take steps to halt the bloodshed. They also boldly exploited American territory to the south and struggled with the Americans for control of the West Coast. Fur men journeyed to the Pacific during the War of 1812, following the lead of such bold pioneers as Alexander Mackenzie and Fraser.

While the fur men opened up the far west and traveled northward beyond the Arctic Circle, immigration from the British Isles gradually swelled the population of eastern Canada. The newcomers moved through the Quebec area and spread out over what was later to become the province of Ontario. As more and more land was cleared, wheat began to be recognized as a valuable export, along with furs, fish, and lumber. Shipbuilding became an important industry also. Canada's principal markets were in the mother country and the British West Indies. To improve transportation eastward from the Great Lakes, the construction of canals began in the 1820's.

As the population of the colonies increased, there was growing discontent among the working Canadian people of both Upper and Lower Canada. Those in Lower Canada resented the power of the British authorities and expanding influence of English and Scotch financiers and industrialists in their territory; those in Upper Canada opposed the privileges, which the Crown granted to the landed gentry, to banks and wealthy corporations, and to the Anglican clergy. Each group wanted more control over the government of its own area. Both were influenced by the development of democratic government in the United States.

In 1837 rebellions flared up. William Lyon Mackenzie led the revolt in Upper Canada, and Luis Papineau was the ringleader among the French Canadians. Little was accomplished by either insurrection, though large numbers of Americans rushed to Mackenzie's assistance. Most of the Canadians had no desire to be "freed" or to win political reform through violence. The revolts, however, brought into the open the discontent, which had been widespread for many years, and the British Government took steps to correct the unhealthy situation in its North American possessions. In 1840 the union of Upper and Lower Canada formed the single province of Canada. But the legislature under this new system still had no control over the Executive, or Governor's Council, which held the purse strings. Eight years passed before the cabinet system of responsible government was established both in Nova Scotia and in the province of Canada.

The Dominion: Progress and Expansion in Canada. In 1846 Great Britain adopted a free trade policy, thereby damaging Canada's commercial position and weakening the ties between colony and mother country. Some Canadians then proposed union with the United States, but the majority came to favor a more independent status, especially after relations between Canada and the United States became severely strained during the American slavery controversy and the War Between the States. Independence required strength; to be strong Canada had to be united. The Charlottetown Convention in 1864 and the Quebec Conference that same year prepared the way for the British North America Act, which in 1867 created the Dominion of Canada.

The original members of the Dominion were Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the province of Canada, which was divided once more - this time into Quebec and Ontario. Price Edward Island, like the American state of Rhode Island in Revolutionary days, had no desire to join its larger neighbors. The tiny island did not enter the Dominion of Canada until 1873.

Before Dominion status was achieved, the population of Canada had passed the three-million mark,, and immigrants in search of good farmland were pushing westward from Ontario. In fact, a good many immigrants, as well as some native Canadians, were already becoming convinced that greener fields lay south of the border, and emigration form Canada to the United States was getting under way. But the Dominion was taking steps to develop its own vast western lands, which had remained empty while under the control of the Hudson's Bay Company. The extension of government authority to the west was checked only briefly by the Red River Rebellion of 1869, in which Louis Riel, with some American supporters, attempted to stave off the advance of civilization to that region.

In 1870 Manitoba became the fifth province, and a year later British Columbia became the sixth. To persuade the West Coast Province to enter the Dominion, the government had to promise to construct a railroad to the Pacific. In 1874 the Northwest Mounted Police, organized the previous year, set out to maintain law and order in the wilderness and on the plains, but it was not until 1905 that Saskatchewan and Alberta became members of the Dominion. Twenty years earlier the transcontinental Canadian Pacific Railway was completed, after years of heroic effort and tremendous expense. The railroad opened up the prairie wheat country, established towns, and attracted streams of immigrants with its offers of free land. After leading a second rebellion by Louis Riel, he was executed in 1885, the year of the railroad's completion.

Immigration was heaviest between 1900 and the beginning of World War I; its peak of more than 400,000 in 1913 was about one thirteenth of the total population at the turn of the century. After 1911 the drive to the Wheatland's decreased, and the older, more industrialized provinces of Ontario and Quebec began to attract more newcomers, as well as many who had tried, and failed, to make their fortunes on the prairies. These early years of the twentieth century were a period of great political and economic development in the Dominion, with Canada rapidly winning a place for itself among the nations of the world. As Prime Minister from 1896 to 1911, Sir Wilfrid Laurier, the French-Canadian leader of the Liberal party, carried on the work begun by such earlier executives as Sir John MacDonald and Alexander Mackenzie.

Canada and the World Wars: Despite opposition from the French Canadians to participation in "England's War", Canada contributed greatly to the Allied cause in World War I, both in manpower and in material. About four fifths of the 600,000 men who entered the armed services enlisted voluntarily; more then 35,500 men were killed in action. Wheat production soared, and new industries developed rapidly. Although wheat and flour were the major exports at war's end, factories and mills were attracting more and more workers, and manufactured goods were gaining in importance.

This trend continued in the years that followed. During the 1930's, when drought and depression stalked the land, the population of the Prairie Provinces declined by an amount of a quarter of a million. World War II brought prosperity to both agriculture and industry, but the greatest development was in industry. Again the French Canadians opposed participation in the war, but over a million Canadians entered the services, and over forty thousand gave their lives, including many young French Canadians. Besides creating a first-rate army, navy, and air force with amazing speed, Canada served as one of the outstanding "arsenals of democracy" and played an important part in the development of the atomic bomb.

Political changes occurred both in peace and in war. In 1921 Prime Minister Mackenzie King began the longest career of political leadership in Canadian history. As head of the Liberal party, he served as Prime Minister from 1921 to 1930, except for a three months' interval, and was returned to office in 1935; in 1948 he announced his retirement. In 1931 the dominion took its place in the British Commonwealth of Nations as officially established by the Statute of Westminster. Canada was one of the original members of the United Nations. Pressure from the Liberal West led to the enactment of the Family Allowance Act in 1944, under which the Canadian Government offers financial assistance to families in proportion to the number of dependent children. Social legislation of this nature is receiving increased attention in the nation. In the years after World War II, Canada gave generously to Great Britain and other nations whose economies had been shattered by the conflict and became recognized as one of the few islands of prosperity, democracy, and opportunity in a troubled world.

Of course much has changed since then and the nation of Canada is a thriving country proud of its heritage. Canada is a place that you would be proud to display your Canadian genealogy, family coat of arms or surname history.




Display your Canadian Heritage or Family History from Canada

The Tree Maker can take your Canadian heritage and list the coat of arms or surname history that is in part from Canada or even another country that claims to be the origin. Our genealogy charts can be custom made to fit your lineage or add additional information that you may have found in your research. Free pedigree chart if needed.

Customized Charts With Names

9-Generation Fan Chart Plain

9-Generation Fan Chart with 2 Surname History

9-Generation Fan Chart with Coat of Arms and Surname History

9-Generation Fan Chart with 2 Coats of Arms

7-Generation Bow-Tie Chart

6-Generation Chart

6-Generation Chart 2

5-Generation Chart

5-Generation Couples Chart

4-Generation Couples Chart

Cousin's Chart

Blank Charts With No Names

9-Generation Fan Chart Plain

9-Generation Fan Chart with 2 Surname History

9-Generation Fan Chart with Coat of Arms and Surname History

9-Generation Fan Chart with 2 Coats of Arms

7-Generation Bow-Tie Chart

6-Generation Chart

6-Generation Chart 2

5-Generation Chart

5-Generation Couples Chart

4-Generation Couples Chart


Many of our genealogy friends have research their Canadian heritage to Canada, but found that this was just a point of landing from other countries. Many people came here from England, France, Germany, and Spain to name a few. Your lineage is important to us as we treat these family names as our own when we create a family tree chart. The blazon of arms can be added to most of our genealogy products, so make sure you take a look at all that we offer before making a final decision on how to display your Canadian history.




Family Crest - Alphabetic Surname Listings
A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z
Coat of Arms - Alphabetic Surname Listings
A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z

The Tree Maker ask that you please read the "Frequently Asked Questions" section before ordering. It covers a number of subjects in detail. Most of the questions are in regards to customization to family tree charts, family coat of arms, family crest symbol, Design Your Own Coat of Arms Symbol, surname history, family rings, and last name meaning, but the first few apply to everyone. This will help avoid any problems that could arise about your order. Free pedigree chart if needed. These family tree products make great birthday gifts, Christmas presents, or a Wedding and Anniversary gift.